Brief Bio for Dr. Peter Bilous

 

 

Peter Bilous, M.Sc., Ph.D.
Associate Professor of Chemistry & Biochemistry
Eastern Washington University, 226 Science Building
Cheney WA 99004-2440
Phone: (509)359-7935
email: pbilous@ewu.edu

 

 

Dr. Bilous received his Ph.D. degree in microbiology from McGill University, Montreal, Canada. He has over 15 years of research experience using the principles and practices of microbiology, molecular biology, and biochemistry to study proteins, lipids, DNA, and RNA from various organisms. His postdoctoral research studies at the University of Alberta led to the discovery of two new E. coli genes.

Dr. Bilous joined the Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP) in 1990 as a civilian member, and completed his forensic training at the Ottawa forensic laboratory. He was transferred to the RCMP forensic laboratory in Edmonton, Alberta in 1991 where he served as a DNA resource person during the implementation phase of RFLP-DNA typing analysis. In 1998 he received a merit award for his role in the establishment of the DNA analysis facility at the RCMP Edmonton forensic laboratory, and for his training and teaching duties in several DNA typing courses. Dr. Bilous has personally completed more than 400 forensic cases and has reviewed and been responsible for the quality of work performed in an additional 400 cases. He has testified as an expert witness on DNA and biological evidence in the Courts of Law of three Canadian provinces and in the Northwest Territories of Canada. He also testified in the very first admissibility hearings on DNA evidence in the provinces of Alberta and Manitoba.

Dr. Bilous was a faculty member in the Department of Forensic Science at the University of New Haven, Connecticut, from 2001 to 2004 before joining the Department of Chemisty & Biochemistry at Eastern Washington University. In addition to his teaching responsibilities, he is the principal instructor and advisor to the forensic science students. His research interests include the forensic examination of biological evidence subjected to the destructive forces associated with an arson or explosion situation. His educational interests include using a Problem-Based Learning approach to properly prepare students for the challenges of forensic casework.

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1/10/05

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